The
texts are extracted from the
great work of Dr. Salah Eddine Al-Djazairi.

Les textes sont extraits des excellents travaux du Dr Salah Eddine Al-Djazairi.

The Hidden Debt to Islamic Civilisation; Bayt Al-Hikma; 2005.
The Golden Age and Decline of Islamic Civilisation; Bayt Al-Hikma; 2006.

Je me suis donné la permission d'utiliser ses textes pour ne pas perdre un travail qui pourrait être utile et uniquement pour cette raison. L'auteur qui je suis sur visite parfois ces pages sera certainement ravi de savoir qu'elles ont un certain succès. Je lui serais reconnaissant de bien vouloir me faire parvenir un exemplaire de sa nouvelle édition que je compte traduire un jour in shaa Allah ainsi que de tous ses récentes oeuvres (Urgent Salah, please can't find nowhere your email).


Medicine & Related sciences

 Most works on the history of any science hardly, if ever, devote more than a few pages to the Islamic role, a few paragraphs being the rule. What is written is generally that such Islamic science was copied from the Greeks. The same historians also write that fanatical Islamic Orthodoxy harmed sciences, and persecuted scholars and left a climate of fear that hindered the growth of such sciences. This generalised approach tending at distorting, and belittling Islamic science is strongly present in the history of medicine. The first heading will run through some of its aspects, and then the following headings, with facts, will show how Western history of Islamic medicine, a handful of exceptions aside, is moribund and fundamentally corrupt, at the same time.  

Mathematics

 Of all Islamic sciences, mathematics has been best served by scholarship, most particularly in the recent decades.Kennedy offers a good survey of the mathematical sciences in Islam. Yet despite this, its due place is not adequately recognised, and only a work of vast proportions, a sort of encyclopaedia of Islamic mathematics, written by those who excel at mathematics, Arabic, Islamic history, and the history of mathematics, could do it justice. Muslim mathematics, like other sciences, has also been a victim of the usual historical distortions, which misattribute, or suppress many of its accomplishments, or demean its importance. The following outline aims at raising some such problems. However, as with all other issues addressed in this work, this author does not have the competence, nor the space, to address all matters as adequately as wished. Others in the future will have to pursue the task.

Medicine & Hospitals

 Whilst travelling in the Near East in the years 1183-5, Ibn Jubayr noted one or more hospitals in every city in the majority of the places he passed through, which prompted him to say that hospitals were one of ‘the finest proofs of the glory of Islam,' (and the madrasas another).
Some twenty or so years before, in 1160, another traveller, Benjamin of Tudela, found no fewer than sixty well organized medical institutions in Baghdad .Earlier, in the Muslim West, it was said that there were 50 hospitals in Cordoba.


Arts

  Medieval Western Christian admiration for Islamic arts and aesthetics is symbolised by the long list of Islamic art objects found amongst Western collections. Hence amongst the earliest in the British Museum in London is an Irish bronze gilded cross dating from the 9thcentury with a glass paste in the centre which has the Arabic phrase: `Bismillah’ (in the name of God) in Kufic letters, and in the Musee de Cluny at Paris, there is a silk fabric which came from the tomb of Bishop Bernard de Laccare, which contains Arabic inscriptions: La Illaha Ill Allah, Muhammad rasul Allah (There is no God but God, and Mohammed is his messenger).

Engineering & Technology

 Transferring water to a particular level or over long distances, for a diversity of purposes, such as irrigation, supplying water to private and public places, or pumping water out of flooded mines, has relied on a variety of water raising machines. These machines have constituted matters of focus for Islamic engineers. In relation to the latter cited problem, Al-Qazwini, the 13th century geographer, speaks of a mine where water was found at a depth of 20 cubits. To clear the water from the mine shaft a wheel was set on it and it served to force it up to a tank placed at a higher level. Here, the process was repeated and the water was pumped to a second tank, from which by means of another wheel it was raised to the surface. 


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- Farming Science
- The Accomplishments of Muslim Astronomy at a Glance
- LearningAbout and From Islamic Chemistry
-The Vast Scope of Islamic Geography

- A Word on the Atomic Theory